Download the report This week, the Office of Health Strategy (OHS) unveiled their plan to monitor for unintended consequences of their plan to cap healthcare cost increases. OHS acknowledged in the plan that the Cap “may cause providers to reduce provision of necessary healthcare services so as not to exceed the benchmark.” Only a very…

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It may be counter-intuitive but, despite our high incomes, Connecticut’s generosity in eligibility and provider rates means the federal government provides more support to our program than other states. Medicaid is jointly funded, and administered, by both federal and state governments. Federal funding is highest to states with the lowest per capita incomes. As a…

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Download the report The latest reports (here and here) on Massachusetts’s first-in-the-nation cost cap project raise questions about whether it has worked. Since the cap was implemented in 2013, consumer costs are growing faster than overall healthcare, inflation, or incomes. Despite almost eight years under their cost cap, Massachusetts’s out-of-pocket costs and premiums have grown…

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Read the report According to the state’s latest report, Connecticut hospitals provided totaled $806 million in uncompensated care last year, up 5.3% from 2018. Uncompensated care is the total of charity care, provided to needy patients that hospitals never expected to be reimbursed, plus bad debt, care provided that patients couldn’t or wouldn’t pay for.…

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A new CMS analysis finds that between 2015 and 2019, US insurance premiums rose while enrollment in insurance exchanges went down. The report found that 85% of the drop in enrollment was in unsubsidized coverage. People with incomes below 400% of the federal poverty level ($51,040 for an individual, $86,880 for a family of three)…

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In good news, Americans are getting preventive and maintenance care visits, according to an analysis by the Commonwealth Fund. But progress is not even. While visits to dermatologists and for adult primary care are higher than before the pandemic, unfortunately behavioral health care visits and visits for young children have not rebounded. This is particularly…

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Allowing safe sites for injecting opioids in the US would save lives and lower healthcare spending significantly for affected communities, according to ICER’s latest draft evidence report. In 2018, opioid overdoses killed 948 Connecticut residents and there are signals that the rate has risen during the pandemic. Supervised injection facilities (SFIs) are part of a…

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A new data set and report from RAND finds that Connecticut hospital prices paid by commercial plan were 215% of Medicare in 2018, varying from 144% for UConn Health to 282% for Stamford Health. If commercial plans had paid the same rates as Medicare that year, consumers would have saved $510 million. While high, Connecticut…

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Medicaid members were about 33% more likely to be diagnosed with COVID than other Connecticut residents, according to CHNCT’s presentation Friday to the Medicaid oversight council. The average age of members with COVID was 52 years but ranged from newborn to 102 years old. Like the rest of the population, COVID hit Medicaid members with…

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Healthcare policymaking in CT can be complex and frustrating. But you’re not alone and there is help. With generous support from the Connecticut Health Foundation, we’ve updated our Health Advocacy Toolbox. The comprehensive site covers legislative, administrative, and state budget advocacy, how to change public opinion, finding and working in coalitions, effective communications, and how…

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